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Local Turkish Americans Speak Out Against Military Coup

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – Turkish Americans in the Miami Valley came together Saturday to speak out against the failed military coup. Turkish Americans meeting in Dayton say they want peace restored in their county. And they want to know that anyone involved in the coup, will be held responsible. “We need unity among our community,” Turkish American Community Center President Islom Shakhbandarov said. “We need solidarity among our community.

Turkey Demands Extradition of Fethullah Gulen from US

Image US-Turkish tensions have grown after government forces put down an attempted coup on Friday night. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused exiled Turkish businessman and cleric Fethullah Gulen of orchestrating the violence and is demanding that the US extradite him. Gulen, who lives in Pennsylvania, denied any involvement and condemned the coup attempt.

What's Behind Turkey's Coup & Purge?

Image By Brandon Turbeville - mintpressnews.com - Protesters hold a giant Turkish flag as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, Monday, July 18, 2016. Turkey's Interior Ministry has fired nearly 9,000 police officers, bureaucrats and others and detained thousands of suspected plotters following a foiled coup against the government, Turkey's state-run news agency reported Monday. Protesters hold a giant Turkish flag as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, Monday, July 18, 2016. Turkey’s Interior Ministry has fired nearly 9,000 police officers, bureaucrats and others and detained thousands of suspected plotters following a foiled coup against the government, Turkey’s state-run news agency reported Monday.

The Empire of the US-based Imam Accused in the Turkish Coup Attempt

Image The ’Splainer (as in, “You’ve got some ’splaining to do”) is an occasional feature in which RNS gives you everything you need to know about current events to help you hold your own at a cocktail party. (RNS) Turkey’s crackdown of those suspected in the failed July 15 military coup widens, with the firing of 492 people at its top Islamic authority. And Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is zeroing in on a Muslim cleric living in rural Pennsylvania, whom he accuses of masterminding the coup. Reclusive Turkish imam Fethullah Gulen, who lives in a gated compound in the Poconos, denies involvement and disavows violence. Erdogan is pressuring the U.S. to extradite Gulen, but Secretary of State John Kerry, rejecting insinuations that the U.S. was involved in the coup, said it awaits a formal extradition request and proof of Gulen’s involvement.

What Would the U.S. Do If the Turkish Military's Coup Attempt Had Succeeded?

Image Had Turkey’s military succeeded in toppling President Recep Tayyip Erdogan last Friday, by seizing and consolidating power, and the public acquiesced, how would the U.S. have reacted? Counterfactuals are, of course, impossible to game out. But that thought experiment shows the difficulty the U.S. might have faced trying to reconcile its interest in a stable Turkey with its commitment to a democratic one. The problem of reconciling U.S. values and interests isn’t limited to Turkey, though those issues might be at the fore this week; this pertains to several partners in the Middle East.

Turkey in Shake-up of Security Forces After Failed Coup

Turkish authorities have announced a shake-up of the security forces a week after a section of the army attempted to overthrow the government in a failed coup. In the most significant institutional changes since the coup attempt, Interior Minister Efkan Ala said on Friday that the gendarmerie would in future fall under the interior ministry and not the army. The gendarmerie, which is responsible for public order in rural areas that fall outside the jurisdiction of police forces, as well as assuring internal security and general border control, had always been part of the military and its removal is a blow to the armed forces' clout.

Post Turkey coup attempt article by US Writer Draws Ire

Image Turkey's bloody coup attempt plotted by the Fetullah Terrorist Organization is not seen as a threat to democracy, according to an article written by American writer Steven Cook. The article published on Thursday in U.S.-based magazine The Atlantic, which is headlined "How Erdogan Made Turkey Authoritarian Again", overlooks the people's struggle to protect the country's democracy, rushing to the streets to stop the illegal coup attempt, but rather says it "would not have brought an end to Turkey’s democracy". The article claimed that only Turkey's ruling party's progress would have been lost, ignoring the fact that coup plotters bombed the Turkish parliament, a clear intention to harm the democratic functioning of the country.

Has Turkey Lost Its Luster for Luxury Brands?

ImageDEC (NYT) Stellar growth in once white-hot emerging markets appears to have gone out of fashion for much of the luxury sector. Sales in China have slowed in line with its cooling economy, while stagnating demand in Russia and Brazil continues to take its toll. Now in Turkey — a country that physically and culturally straddles East and West with one of the industry’s fastest-growing markets and a young and booming middle class — luxury heavyweights who invested there recently may be taking stock.

TET Amerika'da 150 Milyon Dolarlik Is Baglantisi Yapti

Image Elektrik Elektronik ve Hizmet İhracatçıları Birliği (TET) desteğiyle oluşturulan yazılım sektörü ticaret heyeti, ABD'ye gerçekleştirdiği ziyaret kapsamında 150 milyon dolarlık iş bağlantısı kurdu. Washingon, DC'deki ikili görüşmeleri New York merkezli TOA Consulting firmasının yaptığı toplantılarda, Türkiye'nin yazılım potansiyeli Amerikalı firmalara tanıtıldı. TET açıklamasına göre Birlik, Ekonomi Bakanlığı'nın Uluslararası Rekabetin Geliştirilmesi (UR-GE) Tebliği teşvikleri kapsamında hayata geçirdiği Yazılım Yurtdışı Pazarlama Takımı (Tetsoft) projesiyle yeni pazarlara açılmanın yolları arıyor.

Kenan Evren, Leader of Turkey's 1980 military Coup and Former President, Dies

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General Kenan Evren in 1977. Photograph: -/AFP/Getty Images
Kenan Evren, the general who led Turkey's 1980 military coup that ended years of street clashes between rival left- and right-wing militias but also unleashed a wave of arrests, torture and extrajudicial killings, died on Saturday. He was 97. Evren, who later ruled as president for seven years, died at Ankara?s GATA military hospital, the state-run Anadolu agency reported, hours after he was placed on a respirator because of multiple organ failure and his family and lawyers were called to his side.
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