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Turkish Businessman Alptekin Rejects Kidnapping Plot Allegations

A Turkish businessman on Saturday refuted “fabricated” allegations that a former aide to U.S President Donald Trump discussed with Turkish representatives, a quid pro quo plan to kidnap Fetullah Gulen, the U.S based-leader of the Fetullah Terror Organization (FETO). The Wall Street Journal claimed in a report that Ekim Alptekin, a Turkish businessman, organized a meeting between former White House National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and Turkish representatives in 2016. Alptekin told Anadolu Agency: “Turkey and the possible bilateral relations with the U.S. -- and nothing illegal -- were discussed in the meeting."

Turkish Dep. PM Demands US ‘Immediately’ Arrest Gulen

The U.S. needs to “immediately” arrest the head of the Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO), Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus said Monday. Terror leader Fetullah Gulen, who martyred many and tried to overthrow democracy in Turkey last July, resides in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania as if nothing happened, Kurtulmus said at a news conference at the Presidential Palace while a Cabinet meeting was being held separately.

Who Was Behind The 15th July Coup In Turkey?

By Yıldıray Oğur * / Ceren Kenar * - The first failed coup attempt in Turkey, after four ‘successful’ ones, happened on 22nd February 1962. In the elections held a month after the hanging of Prime Minister Adnan Menderes, the political parties that were a continuation of the political party he was head of, the Democrat Party won the majority. These results troubled a radical Kemalist group and Military Academy Commander Talat Aydemir attempted a coup. The coup was suppressed with difficulty; Captain Aydemir was told to resign and then duly pardoned. However the captain tried to organize a coup again a year later on 21st May 1963. There were clashes in front of the Parliament in Ankara, jets bombed the Military Academy. Talat Aydemir and the putschists surrendered. This time, the captain was brought to court. He was sentenced to death. At his trial he said: “If you set me free today, I’d organize a coup again”

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Turkish Ambassador Highlights How July 15 Coup Stands Out In 'Unfortunate History'

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: This week marks one year since a bloody coup attempt in Turkey. More than 200 people died when rogue officers tried to oust President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Earlier this week, our colleague Robert Siegel interviewed the man the Turkish government holds responsible for that coup attempt, Fethullah Gulen. He's an Islamic cleric who lives in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania. And he denies he was behind the coup. Turkey wants the U.S. to extradite him. Today Robert talked to the Turkish ambassador to the United States to hear his government's version of events.

Turkey's Largest Information Campaign Denounces FETO

In one of its largest information campaigns, Turkey has communicated to the international community its stance against the Fetullah Terrorist Organisation (FETO), responsible for the defeated coup last July. FETO and the defeated coup on July 15, 2016, remained the most discussed issue by top Turkish officials and their foreign counterparts, sources in the foreign ministry said Thursday.

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FETÖ Could 'Poison' US-Turkey Ties if US Doesn't Take Action

Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu warned the U.S. authorities Thursday that the Gülenist Terror Group (FETÖ) members residing in the country would "poison the Turkish-American cooperation." Speaking at a panel called "July 15 Coup Attempt: A Year After" at the Turkish Heritage Organization via conference call, Çavuşoğlu said that Turkey was trying to clean the FETÖ factions that had infiltrated all institutions of the government, however, "the crime ring carries on activity through its schools, businesses and lobbying on global level."

Destiny, Duty and Democracy: Turkey A Year After the Failed Coup

Vahide Sevkatlioglu was willing to die. So was Ilhami Cil. They are two of the roughly 2,500 people who now carry the formal title "Gazi," or veteran, in Turkey after flooding the streets on July 15, 2016 to stop those trying to topple their government. For them, it was a mixture of duty and destiny; a unifying night for a country with a history of military coups. This was the night they said "enough." Even critics of the government made it clear they were relieved to see the coup fail. But the tumultuous months since have created a Turkey where democracy's definition depends on who you ask.

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