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Nearly 500 People On Trial In Turkey Over Failed Coup

Nearly 500 people are standing trial in Turkey's capital, Ankara, for their alleged roles in a failed coup attempt last July. "They're charged with murder, violating the constitution and attempting to kill the president," NPR's Lauren Frayer reports from Turkey. "Most are military officers who were stationed at an airbase where fighter jets took off and bombed Parliament on the night of the attempted coup last summer." The failed coup killed some 249 civilians and the government declared a state of emergency. Then, it suspended or fired about 150,000 people from their jobs, NPR's Peter Kenyon reported, and arrested more than 50,000. The crackdown has drawn criticism from human rights groups.

Joint Event: The Failed Coup in Turkey: One Year Later

July 12, 2017 – A year after the failed attempted military coup in Turkey that took place in the night of July 15, 2016, we are reminded about the universal value of a basic norm: in all modern democracies the military respects and abides by the principle of civilian rule. Any military uprising or coup against duly elected civilian authorities is treason. On July 12, 2107, the Global Policy Institute, (GPI), in cooperation with BAU International University, and the July 15 Foundation, a Turkish organization, held an event titled: The Failed Coup in Turkey: One Year Later Reflections by Turkish and American Experts and Eyewitnesses

President Erdogan Tells BBC: EU Wastes Turkey's Time

Turkey will find it "comforting" if the EU says it cannot be accepted as a member, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has told the BBC. Speaking to HARDtalk's Zeinab Badawi, he said Turkey was "able to stand on its own two feet". He also denied the country had jailed 150 journalists, saying only two people with press cards were in prison. Meanwhile, Turkey extended the detention of the local director of Amnesty International and nine others. Idil Eser was detained on 5 July during a digital security and information management workshop, along with seven other rights activists and two foreign trainers. The 10 are accused of being members of an "armed terrorist organisation" - although Amnesty says it is unclear which one. Their detention has raised alarm internationally, increasing fears that freedom of expression is being suppressed under President Erdogan.

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