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Turkish Ambassador Highlights How July 15 Coup Stands Out In 'Unfortunate History'

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: This week marks one year since a bloody coup attempt in Turkey. More than 200 people died when rogue officers tried to oust President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Earlier this week, our colleague Robert Siegel interviewed the man the Turkish government holds responsible for that coup attempt, Fethullah Gulen. He's an Islamic cleric who lives in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania. And he denies he was behind the coup. Turkey wants the U.S. to extradite him. Today Robert talked to the Turkish ambassador to the United States to hear his government's version of events.

Turkey's Largest Information Campaign Denounces FETO

In one of its largest information campaigns, Turkey has communicated to the international community its stance against the Fetullah Terrorist Organisation (FETO), responsible for the defeated coup last July. FETO and the defeated coup on July 15, 2016, remained the most discussed issue by top Turkish officials and their foreign counterparts, sources in the foreign ministry said Thursday.

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Destiny, Duty and Democracy: Turkey A Year After the Failed Coup

Vahide Sevkatlioglu was willing to die. So was Ilhami Cil. They are two of the roughly 2,500 people who now carry the formal title "Gazi," or veteran, in Turkey after flooding the streets on July 15, 2016 to stop those trying to topple their government. For them, it was a mixture of duty and destiny; a unifying night for a country with a history of military coups. This was the night they said "enough." Even critics of the government made it clear they were relieved to see the coup fail. But the tumultuous months since have created a Turkey where democracy's definition depends on who you ask.

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