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What Would the U.S. Do If the Turkish Military's Coup Attempt Had Succeeded?

Image Had Turkey’s military succeeded in toppling President Recep Tayyip Erdogan last Friday, by seizing and consolidating power, and the public acquiesced, how would the U.S. have reacted? Counterfactuals are, of course, impossible to game out. But that thought experiment shows the difficulty the U.S. might have faced trying to reconcile its interest in a stable Turkey with its commitment to a democratic one. The problem of reconciling U.S. values and interests isn’t limited to Turkey, though those issues might be at the fore this week; this pertains to several partners in the Middle East.

Turkey in Shake-up of Security Forces After Failed Coup

Turkish authorities have announced a shake-up of the security forces a week after a section of the army attempted to overthrow the government in a failed coup. In the most significant institutional changes since the coup attempt, Interior Minister Efkan Ala said on Friday that the gendarmerie would in future fall under the interior ministry and not the army. The gendarmerie, which is responsible for public order in rural areas that fall outside the jurisdiction of police forces, as well as assuring internal security and general border control, had always been part of the military and its removal is a blow to the armed forces' clout.

Post Turkey coup attempt article by US Writer Draws Ire

Image Turkey's bloody coup attempt plotted by the Fetullah Terrorist Organization is not seen as a threat to democracy, according to an article written by American writer Steven Cook. The article published on Thursday in U.S.-based magazine The Atlantic, which is headlined "How Erdogan Made Turkey Authoritarian Again", overlooks the people's struggle to protect the country's democracy, rushing to the streets to stop the illegal coup attempt, but rather says it "would not have brought an end to Turkey’s democracy". The article claimed that only Turkey's ruling party's progress would have been lost, ignoring the fact that coup plotters bombed the Turkish parliament, a clear intention to harm the democratic functioning of the country.

Has Turkey Lost Its Luster for Luxury Brands?

ImageDEC (NYT) Stellar growth in once white-hot emerging markets appears to have gone out of fashion for much of the luxury sector. Sales in China have slowed in line with its cooling economy, while stagnating demand in Russia and Brazil continues to take its toll. Now in Turkey — a country that physically and culturally straddles East and West with one of the industry’s fastest-growing markets and a young and booming middle class — luxury heavyweights who invested there recently may be taking stock.
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