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Academicians (30)

"Turkish American scientists and acholars araound the country. Their success stories, discoveries, inventions... They build a sustainable science bridge between the U.S. and Turkey. This bridge would facilitate the flow of scientists and scholars, knowledge, and technology and help link science and technology institutions in the two countries."

Prominent Turkish Historian Kemal Karpat Dies at Age 96

Internationally acclaimed Turkish historian Kemal Karpat died on Feb. 20 in the United States aged 96. Karpat, an expert on the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkish history, was an emeritus professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He had celebrated his 96th birthday on Feb. 15. Professor Karpat taught in Department of History of University of Wisconsin-Madison for 36 years, from 1967 until his retirement in 2003. His research pioneered the study of late Ottoman history, and focused on the rise of ethnic nationalism and Islamic political discourse. He leaves a rich legacy as one of the leading Ottoman historians of his generation.  He also will be remembered for his contributions to the study of Ottoman History in higher education. During his time at UW-Madison, Karpat served as director of the Center for Turkish Studies, and contributed funds to its endowment. Karpat also endowed a professorship in Ottoman and Turkish History, which is currently held by Professor Daniel Stolz.

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Bridging Cultures Through Archaeology: Exploring Ancient Turkey for 40 Years

Charles Brian Rose is an American archaeologist, classical scholar, and author. He is the James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania in the Classical Studies Department and the Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. After graduating from Haverford in 1978, Rose pursued his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at Columbia University. Concentrating on the Roman Imperial period, his interests expanded to include the eastern Mediterranean, where he took part in New York University’s excavation at Aphrodisias, Turkey, and the uncovering there of a large and extremely well-preserved early 1st century AD sanctuary dedicated to the Imperial Cult (the cult of the emperors). His thesis, completed in 1987 and published in 1997 by Cambridge University Press, examined the sculpture, coins, and inscriptions associated with the Imperial Cult throughout the Mediterranean world during the period demarked by the life of Julius Caesar (100–44 BC) through to the suicide of Nero in AD 68.

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Prof McCarthy: “History Books Do Often Treat Turks Unfairly”

Justin A. McCarthy is a nationally and internationally recognized scholar of the Ottoman Empire, modern Turkey and the Middle East.  He has published eleven books, most recently The Armenian Rebellion at Van (2006). In 1996 University of Louisville recognized him with the Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research, and Creative Activity. He holds an honorary doctorate from Boğaziçi University, Turkey, and is a board member of the Institute of Turkish Studies and the Center for Eurasian Studies (AVIM). McCarthy served in the Peace Corps in Turkey in 1969, where he taught at Middle East Technical University and Ankara University.

Turkey Bids Farewell to Renowned Historian Kemal Karpat

The last rites of internationally acclaimed historian Kemal Karpat were performed on Feb. 25 in a state ceremony. Karpat died of natural causes on Feb. 20 in the U.S. at the age of 96. In a funeral ceremony held at Istanbul University, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said the Turkish people should follow his footsteps and pursue "even greater" academic achievements. "He was able to approach the old debates of Turkey in a much more realistic and moderate way," Erdoğan said. Erdoğan said the birthplace of the historian, Dobruja region of Romania, could seem far from Turkey today, but Karpat was born to Turkish parents.

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Prominent Turkish Historian Kemal Karpat Dead in US at 96

Internationally acclaimed Turkish historian Kemal Karpat died on Feb. 20 in the United States aged 96, a Turkish official said. Turkish Consul General in Chicago Umut Acar told Anadolu Agency that Karpat died of multi-organ failure in Madison, Wisconsin at around 6.40 p.m (1240GMT). Karpat, an expert on the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkish history, was an emeritus professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He celebrated his 96th birthday on Feb. 15, said Acar.

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Muslim Academicians from US, Canada Visit Turkey

A group of Muslim academicians teaching at universities in the U.S. and Canada visited Turkey and attended a conference on Tuesday. Turkish Deputy Foreign Minister Yavuz Selim Kiran also attended the conference, which was jointly organized by Turkey's Center for Strategic Research (SAM) and Turken Foundation. Speaking at the conference Kiran said Turkey is closely following the U.S.’s investigation into Fetullah Terrorist Organization’s (FETO) activities. FETO and its U.S.-based leader Fetullah Gulen orchestrated the defeated coup of July 15, 2016 in Turkey, which left 251 people martyred and nearly 2,200 injured.

Bitcoin Cash Devcon Gets Commended By Cornell Professor Emin Gün Sirer

Emin Gün Sirer is a renowned computer scientist who is Turkish-American. He is currently a professor at Cornell University who has made a lot of contributions to the development of the cryptocurrency industry, computer networking and operating systems. Speaking about the debate regarding cryptocurrency as a medium of exchange or a store of value at the San Francisco Blockchain Week, he declared his support for Bitcoin Cash.

Vamik Volkan Says Psychological Borders Become Physical Ones

Actual walls made of brick or stone, such as the one President Trump would like to build between the U.S. and Mexico, are built as physical borders to protect a large-group identity psychologically, a professor said Wednesday. “So America, the great, will be psychologically protected,” said  Dr. Vamik Volkan, emeritus professor of Psychiatry at UVa. Volkan, author of more than 50 books and a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, spoke Wednesday night at Waynesboro Public Library on "The Psychology of Immigrants and Refugees.” Sherry Von Oeyen of Staunton, who attended with her husband Bob,  said she felt she learned something from Volkan’s talk about immigrants and refugees, and she does not want the U.S. to build walls.

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Professor Gokhan Hotamisligil Receives 2018 EASD–Novo Nordisk Foundation Diabetes Prize for Excellence

Turkish American Professor Gokhan S. Hotamisligil received the 2018 EASD–Novo Nordisk Foundation Diabetes Prize for Excellence for his outstanding research efforts that have led to groundbreaking new knowledge about the relationship between obesity and diabetes and potential paths for treatment.

Betül Kaçar Invokes the Past in Modern Bacteria

Betül Kaçar joined The University of Arizona Molecular and Cell Biology department as an astrobiology professor. This is a first time a molecular biology professorship position specifically targeted for origins of life and astrobiology. After earning her PhD in Bio Molecular Chemistry at Emory University’s School of Medicine and Chemistry, she developed an interest in evolution and deep questions that impacted the way life is today. She applied for a NASA postdoctoral fellowship. They awarded her with this fellowship and she also received a NASA Early Career Fellowship, as well as a grant from the Exobiology Branch of NASA. Kaçar responded TURKOFAMERICA’s questions.

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