Latest Developments of U.S. Potential Sale of F-16s to Turkey

The discussions in Congress after the meeting between the U.S. President, Joe Biden, and Turkish President Erdogan at the NATO Leaders' Summit in Madrid, when President Biden declared, "We must sell F-16s to Turkey," are still ongoing.

Jim Inhofe, a U.S. Senate's Armed Services Committee ranking member, stated, "I support ongoing discussions. It's in the best interest of the U.S. and NATO to keep Turkey in the fold and drive a wedge between Turkey and Russia."

Democrat Senator Shaheen, Foreign Affairs Committee Member, said, "Turkey remains a valuable ally and a critical regional security partner for the United States and NATO. I remain committed to maintaining the already robust bilateral security relationship between our two countries. The F16 upgrade package submitted by the Biden administration - like any foreign arms sale - will ultimately have to go through a comprehensive review by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to ensure that the deal will benefit our joint security interests. As a member of that committee, I will work with the committee and ask questions of the administration to thoroughly review their request." 

Republican Congressman Chris Smith, a House Foreign Affairs Committee Member, stated that sellingF-16 fighter jets and modernization kits to Turkey is an egregious mistake and would go against CAATSA.

Democrat Congresswoman Titus led members of the Hellenic Caucus in reaction to Biden Administration's statement regarding F-16 Sales to Turkey. Her joint statement with five of her colleagues said thatWhile Turkey's relenting on their opposition to Sweden and Finland joining NATO is a welcome development, there are still too many outstanding issues to move forward with the sale of F-16s to Erdoğan's government."

While Senator Graham (R-SC), who visited Ankara recently, stated that President Biden supports the delivery of F-16s to Turkey, many other Senate Foreign Affairs Committee members will wait for the Biden administration's facts about the potential sale to Turkey and then will make a decision. 

Gregory Meeks, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, and four delegate members are currently visiting Turkey after a visit to Greece. The U.S. delegation includes House Foreign Affairs Committee Members Ted Deutch, David Cicilline, G.K. Butterfield, and Stacy Plaskett. 

35 House Representatives sent a bipartisan letter to President Biden opposing the proposed Sale of F-16 Fighter Jets to Turkey yesterday.

Biden administration's support for Turkey continues.

While White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said, "We've been very clear about the F-16. That conversation about the F-16 and Turkey has been around for some time. We talked about this several months ago. So there's nothing new. The president has supported that effort," 

"The United States supports Turkey's modernization of its fighter fleet because that is a contribution to NATO security and therefore American security," said Celeste Wallander, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, on a press call.

Regarding Turkey's demand for F-16s, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, Jones, said: at the Foreign Press Center briefing "We support the sale, and President Biden has said that he is willing to work with Congress on this matter."

In September of last year, Turkey requested the purchase of 40 F16 fighter aircraft and nearly 80 F-16 modernization kits for its existing warplanes. 

The U.S. Department of State noted in a letter sent to Congress in March that “The Administration believes that there are nonetheless compelling long-term NATO alliance unity and capability interests, as well as U.S. national security, economic and commercial interests that are supported by appropriate U.S. defense trade ties with Turkey,”

It is not clear when Biden will meet with members of Congress on the F-16 issue; however, a delegation from the Grand National Assembly of Turkey is expected to come to Washington DC to meet with their U.S. counterparts shortly.

The Latest Update on the Biden Administration's China Policy

Journalist Ali Cinar shared the latest developments  on the Biden Administration's China Policy. Biden Administration is getting ready to announce easing in some China tariffs soon.

U.S. President Joe Biden has not announced a formal roadmap for establishing future trade and political relations between the U.S. and China since January 2021. After President Biden's comments supporting Taiwan's defense during his May visit to Japan, Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense Loyd Austin stated that the U.S. has a "One China" policy.

To combat inflation, President Biden asked Gina Raimondo, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, to work on removing some of the tariffs implemented during President Trump's Administration.

Similarly, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said some tariffs on China inherited from the Administration of former President Trump served "no strategic purpose" and added that President Biden was reviewing them as a way to bring down inflation. "We all recognize that China engages in a range of unfair trade practices that are important to address, but the tariffs we inherited, some serve no strategic purpose and raise the cost to consumers," she added.

According to U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai, Washington will actively pressure China, the second-largest economy in the world, to alter its business practices. Tai emphasized that the U.S. "will not be indifferent anymore" to the rules of China.

Jake Sullivan, the U.S. National Security Advisor, announced that President Biden and Chinese President Xi would communicate by phone within the next few weeks.

Western allies have become more cautious about China's actions. The G-7 Leader's announcement of a $600 billion Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment to compete with China's Belt and Road Initiative was a solid message to China. In addition, NATO has the first-time addressed challenges that China poses toward NATO's security, interests, and values under the NATO Concept document.

There is a possibility that President Biden may announce this week a rollback of some United States tariffs on Chinese consumer goods -- as well as a new probe into industrial subsidies that could lead to more duties in strategic areas such as technology.

Recently, Secretary of the Treasury Yellen held a virtual meeting with Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China Liu He as part of the Administration's ongoing efforts to maintain open lines of communication. Both discussed macroeconomic and financial developments in the U.S. and China, the global economic outlook amid rising commodity prices, and food security challenges. 

There is a possibility that President Biden may announce this week a rollback of some United States tariffs on Chinese consumer goods -- as well as a new probe into industrial subsidies that could lead to more duties in strategic areas such as technology.

No Agreement Reached Concerning China in the U.S. Congress

The House of Representatives passed the China Competition Bill in February and the Senate in March. It is predicted that the law will provide American manufacturers with $52 billion to reduce U.S. dependency on Chinese products like semiconductors.

In regulating the new bill, it is predicted that American manufacturers will be provided with a $52 billion fund to reduce dependency on products like semiconductors produced by China. Similarly, a $2 billion fund will be provided to promote the production of equipment like critical electronic devices, defense kits, and automobile parts. Supply chain and research and development exercises will also be supported.

Furthermore, regulations on Taiwan are included in the resolution. The issues of human rights and democracy in China, funding cultural exchange between the U.S. and Taiwan, and acknowledging Taiwan as a strategic component of U.S. policy for the Indo-Pacific region.

While efforts are being made to develop a final resolution that both parties can support, Democrats and Republicans are at odds. Democrats in Congress said last week that they believed nothing was standing in the way of them passing the resolution introduced by Chuck Schumer, Majority Leader of the Senate, and Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. According to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, if the Democrats' demands are not met, Republicans will not permit the passage of this resolution through their covert economic agenda.

Industrial groups, including automotive suppliers, have paid close attention to these disputes because they involve funding for developing these semiconductor chips. In a letter to Congress, the CEOs of numerous Fortune 500 companies expressed their support for the law's implementation regarding chip production.

Ali Cinar is a journalist based in Washington, DC. He represents Ciner Media US Group(Haberturk TV and Bloomberg HT). Ali Cinar was awarded the Ellis Island Medal of Honor and was the youngest Turkish American to receive this award in over 30 years. He is a Ph.D. candidate in Communication at Liberty University

President Biden's European Trip

U.S. President Biden will depart from Washington, D.C. on March 23 to attend three crucial meetings in Europe on March 24. He will attend meetings with the Council of the European Union, the Extraordinary Summit of NATO leaders, and the leaders of the G7 countries. The main items on the agenda will be an evaluation of the Russian invasion of Ukraine and new steps that can be taken. In particular, discussions will be held on the matter of whether any further sanctions should be imposed in addition to the joint sanctions decided upon by the U.S., the U.K., and the European Union. It is expected that a decision will be made at the NATO summit, which will strengthen the Eastern Flank and Baltic countries in NATO from a military point of view.

The U.S. currently has 100,000 soldiers in Europe, with 14,000 of these in the Eastern European Bloc. White House spokesperson Jen Psaki said, "It will be a very long day" of meetings for President Biden on Thursday, March 24.

Psaki added, "His goal is to meet in person with his European counterparts to talk about, and assess, where we are at this point in the conflict, in the invasion of Ukraine by Russia. To date, we have been incredibly aligned with our European allies, but this does not happen by accident. The President is a big believer in face-to-face diplomacy. So, it is an opportunity to do exactly that."

President Biden announced his visit shortly before signing the draft legislation pledging $13.6 billion of additional military and humanitarian aid to Ukraine as part of the $1.5 trillion government spending measures. This visit is scheduled to take place after Vice President Kamala Harris has completed her visit to the Eastern Bloc NATO countries.

Polish Foreign Minister, Zbigniew Rau, has said that it is likely that Biden will visit Poland while in Europe. According to the U.N., nearly two million Ukrainian refugees have entered Poland since the start of the war. Psaki did not have any further details on whether Biden would visit Poland during the trip.

Biden Administration Expresses Appreciation for Turkey

The Biden administration has thanked Turkey for its diplomatic efforts. During a press conference held by Secretary of State Blinken, he confirmed that he was pleased with Turkey's initiatives to bring the Ukrainian and Russian leaders together. He also said that the two NATO allies would continue to act together in coordination against Russia. U.S. Secretary of State Blinken spoke to his Turkish counterpart, Çavuşoğlu, telephonically, while the U.S. Secretary for Defense Austin met his Turkish counterpart, Akar, in person, in Brussels last week.

President Biden is not expected to meet Erdoğan.

During the NATO Leaders' Summit on March 24, President Biden and President Erdoğan were not expected to meet. An in-person meeting is likely to happen during the NATO 2022 Leaders' Summit being held in Spain June 29–30.

President Biden signs the 2022 defense bill

U.S. President Joe Biden signed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which includes defense expenditures for the fiscal year of 2022 and was approved by Congress last month.

The $768.2 billion NDAA -signed into law by Biden- provides $740 billion for the Department of Defense (Pentagon), $27.8 billion for defense-related expenditures in the Department of Energy, and $0.4 billion for other defense-related activities.

The NDAA passed the House of Representatives on December 7, and the Senate approved it on December 15.

What does the bill include about Turkey?


Amendments to investigate and report on the utilization of drones in the Nagorno-Karabakh war and to remove the exception which blocks the aid to Azerbaijan were added to the NDAA.

The word "Turkey '' was mentioned once, and Azerbaijan was mentioned four times in the 2,165 pages long NDAA.

- Page 1089: A United States diplomatic strategy for 19 Syria, including a description of the desired diplomatic objectives for advancing United States national interests in Syria, desired end-goals, and a description of the intended diplomatic and related foreign policy means to achieve such objectives, including engagement with key foreign actors operating in 2 Syria such as Russia and Turkey

- $522 million Counter ISIS program in Syria and Iraq ($177 million support for YPG/PKK in Syria)

"U.S. - Greece Defense and Interparliamentary Partnership Act" introduced by Menendez and Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) was also added to the NDAA.

The bill envisions full support for the military modernization of Greece,
approves and accelerates the sales of new U.S. military equipment and fosters cooperation between Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and the U.S.

The bill includes articles that authorize the President of the U.S. to expedite the supply and delivery process of F-35s if Greece decides to buy them from the U.S.

The bill also includes numerous articles about sexual assault in the Army, extremism, and fighting against racism. It also consists of a 2.7 percent increase in basic military pay.

The bill increases the minimum required time for someone who retired from the U.S. Army to become the Secretary of Defense from 7 years to 10 years. The requirement to become secretary-general is similarly increased from 5 years to 7 years.

The bill increases the annual military support to Ukraine from $250 million to $300 million. It also mandates $4 billion in funds for the anti-Russia European Deterrence Initiative and $100 million in military support to Baltic countries.

The bill stipulates that China's military moves in the region should be closely monitored. It requests the continuation of the defense cooperation with Taiwan as necessary and calls to ensure that the Taiwanese Army stays modern.

The bill calls for the formation of the independent Afghanistan War Commission, which will examine the 20-year war waged by the U.S. in Afghanistan following its withdrawal.

  • Published in Politics

President Biden: "America is Rising Anew"

The U.S. President Joe Biden has addressed a joint session in Congress for the first time since taking office. President Biden declared that "America is rising anew" in his speech, in which he highlighted his economic plans.

The U.S. President has started his speech by saying, "It has been 100 days since I inherited a nation in crisis. I can tell you this after 100 days: America is advancing again by turning peril into possibility, crisis into opportunity, setbacks into strengths."

Highlighting the process made regarding the fight with the pandemic since his taking office, Joe Biden said, "Less than 1% of the seniors were fully vaccinated when I was sworn in. Approximately 70% of the seniors are vaccinated after 100 days." He also called for those who have not been vaccinated so far to get the vaccine.

-He explained the details of the family support plan.
-"Middle class" emphasis: "It is time for the wealthiest 1% of the American population to begin to pay their fair share."
-"We must prove America's adversaries wrong." said President Biden. He also stated that they have to prove the U.S. democracy works, solves the public's problems, and gives results.
-George Floyd and the police reform message
"We must work together to eliminate systemic racism in the criminal justice system and to restore the trust between the police and the people they serve," he said.

A message for China

Relations with China were also on the agenda of U.S. President Biden. He said that he clearly stated in his talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping that they do not want conflict with China and they will defend America's interests across the board.

"We can end cancer."
President Biden underlined that America should lead the world in the field of health and science. "I can think of no more worthy investment," said Biden. "Let's end cancer. It is within our power," he stated.

"Gun violence is an epidemic in America."


"I know how hard it is to make progress on this issue. I will do everything in my power to protect the American people from this epidemic of gun violence. But it's time for Congress to act as well." he said.

A first in American history

Behind the President of the U.S. for the first time sat two senior female government officials, Vice President Kamala Harris and the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.

About 200 people watched President's speech due to the pandemic.
 
Polls after the President Speech:
 
CBS News-YouGov: 85% of viewers said they approved of Biden’s speech
 
A CNN-SSRS : 78% of respondents had a very or somewhat positive reaction to Biden’s speech
 
President Biden's first Congressional speech  drew 26.9 million viewers, according to figures from ratings company Nielsen. 45th President Trump's first speech at Congress had 47.7 million viewers in 2017.
 

Journalist, Ali Cinar

Major Pressure on Russia During the Biden Era

The impacts of U.S. President Joe Biden's sanctions against Russia continue to be spoken in the world public opinion. The U.S. administration has stated that it has decided to impose sanctions against Russia for three reasons. Russia's interference in the presidential elections, the cyberattacks on the U.S. energy sector, and the reports that Russia paid bounties on the U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan were indicated. In this framework, Biden Administration has announced that;

- The expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats
- As of June 14, the U.S. financial institutions will be banned from taking part in the primary market for bonds issued by the Central Bank of Russia, the National Wealth Fund of Russia, and the Russian Ministry of Finance
- 6 technology companies that support Russia's cyber activities are also on the sanction list
- There will also be sanctions imposed against 16 individuals and 16 media outlets that tried to interfere in the 2020 presidential elections.

Biden: "Now is time to de-escalate tensions."


By saying that "We could have gone further, but I chose not to do so," in his special 7-minute talk at the White House, President Biden underlined their unwillingness to kick off a cycle of escalation and conflict with Russia. Biden said, 
 
" I propose to Putin that we meet in person this summer in Europe. I expressed concern about Russia's military buildup on Ukraine's border and occupied and unoccupied Crimea. I affirmed U.S. support for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of #Ukraine, and I strongly urge him to refrain from any military action."

Russian Aggression in Ukraine is Still a Major Problem

It is well known that the U.S. Administration is anxious about Russia's ever-increasing troop buildup around the east of Ukraine and provocations. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin met with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg and allied member countries in Brussels and made a joint statement on the territorial integrity of Ukraine. Biden Administration is exercising intense international diplomacy to support Ukraine thoroughly and so that Russia does not take action similar to the annexation of Crimea in 2014.

Unclarity on U.S. Navy Ships in Black Sea  


The U.S. Department of Defense explained  that demand for warships going to the Black Sea wasn't made recently.In addition, Turkish Foreign Ministry announced that the U.S. has given up sending military ships. It is known that the U.S. The Navy routinely conducts operations within the NATO exercise framework in the Black Sea. It is expected that the U.S. will continue pressuring Russia by collaborating with the allies.

It is not clear whether the U.S. sanctions will bring any changes in Russia's actions especially considering that the previous precautions taken by the U.S. failed to terminate the Russian cyber attacks. Some Russian diplomats were also expelled in 2016 during former President Barack Obama's presidency due to Russia's interference. On the other hand, although Donald Trump does not criticize Putin, he had put in place the option of deporting some Russian diplomats upon the allegations of Russia's poisoning a former intelligence service agent in England in 2018.

Journalist, Ali Cinar

Foreign Policy Priorities for the BIDEN Administration and Repair of Global Alliances

Putting democracy, diplomacy, multilateralism, and restoration of alliances at the center of the foreign policy plan with President Biden, the U.S. is trying to correct the erosion of America's image on international platforms in order to resolve the concerns caused by Trump's "America First" doctrine among its allies and to strengthen the alliances. Emphasizing the phrase "America is back," especially in events closely followed by the international community, such as America's reintegration into the Paris Agreement, which was one of his first actions, President Biden has shown that America will lead global issues that require international responsibility and return to the global leadership race.

During his speech at a university in New York in 2019, Biden said, "To me, foreign policy is domestic policy, and domestic policy is foreign policy. They are deeply connected." He added that U.S. security depends directly on "having the strongest network of partners and alliances working alongside one another." Especially since almost all of the National Security and Foreign Policy team was formed during President Obama's term, President Biden knows very well the mistakes made in the past. Likewise, he is also aware that with the COVID-19 outbreak, different dynamics are now emerging in many regions, including the Middle East. In this regard, while talking about American foreign policy's priorities, Secretary of State Antony Blinken's most recent statement, "We are against military coups, we will promote democracy globally," is a very remarkable one. This is particularly important because, in many countries, including Turkey, the perception that the U.S. would overthrow the government using different methods has taken root. Secretary Blinken also underlined that building lasting peace, even in Afghanistan and the Middle East, is now more important than military power.

For the first time since he took office, Biden had the opportunity to express his expectations of Europe and his views on the agenda he wants to create to strengthen transatlantic relations at the Munich Security Conference with the virtual participation of leaders such as the German Chancellor Merkel, French President Macron, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the NATO Secretary-General, the President of the European Commission, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, and the President of the Council of Europe. Expressing America's determination to act together with NATO and its allies against global threats, Biden expressed his satisfaction with the investments made in Europe for developing military capacity and sharing the burden in the field of defense.

One of the important headlines at the summit, which was also included in Biden's agenda, was on China. Many actors in the global system have recently considered the relationship between NATO and Europe. Addressing the long-term strategic competition with China, Biden pointed out the struggle between democracies and autocracies in China and Russia, based on the approach that democracy is an important component of foreign policy. The Chinese issue is increasingly coming to the fore as a matter prioritized by the Biden administration in terms of national security. The fact that the largest team in the White House Security Council is the Indo-Pacific team shows that China is considered a threat, and the region is growing in importance for the United States. In this context, it seems that China is the priority for U.S. foreign policy.

Because Blinken had described China's relations with the U.S. as "The biggest geopolitical test of the 21st century" as well, the fact that the Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and the Secretary of State Antony Blinken's first international trip will be to Japan and South Korea shows how much importance they attach to Asia-Pacific. This first trip, which is expected to be a threat, can also be perceived as the message "We won't let them run riot."

Returning to the Munich Security Conference, the general picture that emerged was that the main actors in the international system expressed their expectations from each other now that America was back and tried to determine to what degree their expectations fell in line with each other. We see that Biden has been trying to show that he wants to build on democracy and unification of foreign policy, as he did to domestic policy. Particularly, Biden's call for the Western alliance to act jointly against existing threats and to unite on the basis of common values and democracy can be considered a cross-reference to the disagreements with the Western ally.

It is expected that Biden will make the same statements on every platform where he finds an opportunity to resolve the disagreements with Macron and Merkel and to persuade European leaders to find joint solutions regarding how to compete with China, restructuring and strengthening NATO. Europe's attitude at this point will also be decisive for the future of transatlantic relations. Likewise, an agenda with broader topics such as "strategic autonomy," an independent Europe, a Europe that does not want to be caught in the U.S.–China trade wars awaits us.

Within the scope of the NATO 2030 plan, America's willingness to work in harmony with Europe on the subjects of restructuring and strengthening the alliance, social health policies in the fight against the pandemic, destructive technological developments, China's rise, Russia's threat, climate change, global terrorism, supporting democracies, reshaping global supply chains and especially the approaches of Germany and France, who are among the important actors of the European Union, on these issues, will also be decisive in terms of how these affairs will develop.

We are in a multipolar international system where the balance of power and alliances change in the face of shifting common interests and threats, technology production plays a critical role in shaping states' national security policies, and where we experience a different dimension of globalization. As emphasized at the Munich Security Conference, with COVID-19 in this new era, in which security will be defined in a much broader sense and will shift from a narrow military-focused approach to a much broader approach; social health, food security, and the climate crisis have become issues related to national security, and the importance of global alliances, transatlantic relations, and international solidarity has been increasing. It is becoming increasingly important that all actors agree on the vision that global issues such as the pandemic, the climate crisis, nuclear disarmament, and the refugee crisis are to be solved not through the singular protectionist and nationalistic policies of the states but through the policies they produce thanks to international cooperation, burden-sharing, and solidarity.

In view of all these internationally changing dynamics, in the Interim National Security Strategy Guidance recently announced by the White House administration, we notice statements that point to the fact that the most powerful U.S. military presence will be in the Pacific region and Europe. This document points that many issues, from China and Russia becoming threats to the U.S. to climate change, rising racism, and technological developments, pose a big problem for the United States. In the document, which points out that the U.S. should shape the future of the international system, the importance of alliances is emphasized notably. President Biden's inclination toward re-entering the Paris Agreement, becoming a member of the World Health Organization again, and sending out the message that "America is back" gives us clues that, after all, he will pursue a foreign policy in cooperation with allies. As expected, in the document, it is emphasized that the U.S. attaches great importance to Israel's security in the Middle East, Iran will be dissuaded from threatening other countries' sovereignty and territorial integrity, and the fight against terrorism will continue. It is also stated that the deficit in the defense budget will be met, and the government will work in coordination with Congress for the army to use technology at the ultimate level.

This era, in which American foreign policy will be shaped together with the allies and transatlantic relations will come to the forefront, also presents opportunities where new partnerships can be forged against new foes in areas where there are existing difficulties and traditional cooperation. These areas include the fight against ISIS in the Middle East, the establishment of peace and stability in Afghanistan within the NATO framework (Blinken's letter to Afghan leaders, where Turkey was asked to be a host is important in terms of our relations), the security of the Black Sea against the Russian threat, and the facilitation of negotiations with Iran. In order to benefit from all these opportunities, mutual trust, understanding, and sincerity have to be re-established on a higher level and between the institutions.

However, President Biden has not yet had a phone call to President Erdogan since he took office. Relevant meetings took place only between Presidential Spokesperson Ibrahim Kalin and National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan and between Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu. Although President Biden started the second round of phone calls with various presidents across the world, the fact that he has not yet called Turkey led to a series of speculations. First, President Biden has concentrated most heavily on domestic policy and the struggle against the pandemic. Turkey, like many countries, is not among Biden's priorities. However, President Biden is a leader who knows Turkey well, with him having visited Turkey four times during his vice presidency. We also know him as a name who has met President Erdogan many times. Currently, the most important problem of Turkish-American relations is the trust issue. The two NATO allies still don't trust each other. Reservations about YPG-PKK, S400/F35, Syria, and human rights in Turkey could be the first agenda items that come to mind. President Biden's remarks against Turkey during his campaign period are the reasons for tension, as well as Turkey's and Russia's intimacy. However, the multi-dimensional nature of Turkish-American relations should not be forgotten. Even though security is the backbone of the relationship of two countries, joint opportunities for innovative collaborations in the field of trade, education, culture, energy, and technology are also on both their agenda.

From the point of view of the U.S., while Congress members have sent three different letters against Turkey to the White House administration, 86 Congress members, who are Turkish friendship group members, also signed those letters. With each passing day, negative Turkish perception increases in Washington D.C., and anti-Turkish groups' common action plays a role in this matter. The action to be taken here is to overcome the problem of trust and to initiate a clear dialog. The closer relations Turkey will establish with Russia and Iran conflict with the interests of the U.S. and other Western countries. Solving problems within the NATO alliance, and Turkey working closely with the U.S. as it did in the past, will be appropriate.  In this context, establishing close relations with the European Union and developing multi-dimensional relations with the Asia-Pacific region, Turkey will continue to be an important ally of the U.S.

Ali Cinar, Senior Foreign Policy Expert and a 2019 Ellis Island Medal of Honor Recipient.Cinar is also Senior Diplomatic Correspondent at Turk of America.

Selma Bardakci, Senior Foreign Policy Expert and Atlas Corp. Alumni (State Department is one of the sponsors of Atlas Corp.)

*** This article has published on The Media Line (Reference) 

On 18 Mar 2021 Thu at 01:30 ALI CINAR

Durakoglu becomes the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary at State Department

The Biden Administration appointed Naz Durakoglu as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Legislative Affairs.This is the highest ranking position that was given to a Turkish American woman in recent State Department History.

Naz Durakoglu is the third Turkish-American woman who received a senior position in the Biden Administration.

Three Successful Turkish-American Women under Biden Administration:

-Didem Nisanci,Chief of Staff, Department of Treasury

-Ozge Guzelsu,Deputy General Counsel (Legislation) of the U.S. Secretary of Defense

Who is Naz Durakoglu?

Prior to returning to the Department of State, she was Senior National Security Advisor to Senator Jeanne Shaheen from 2017 to 2021. In that capacity, she managed Democratic issues and activities on the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation and reestablished the bipartisan Senate NATO Observer Group.

Previously, Ms. Durakoğlu was a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab where she testified before Congress and researched foreign election interference trends. Ms. Durakoğlu also served in the Obama Administration as Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, Victoria Nuland, from 2015 to 2017. She began her career in the U.S. House of Representatives where she held various positions, including as Legislative Director to Congressman Bill Keating and Subcommittee Staff Director on the Foreign Affairs Committee.

Ms. Durakoğlu is a first-generation American who speaks fluent Turkish and holds a B.A. from Rutgers University and a M.A. from the Naval War College.
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